FHIR, SMART and Sidecar Applications

I was reading the SMART on FHIR support group and came across this post from Wes Rishel. I thought it was really good, and so asked him if I could duplicate here. Not only did he agree, but he added some more stuff to it!
Thanks Wes…

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SMART writing

And hot on the heels of the last post that referenced a ‘FAQ’ from the SMART on FHIR Support group is this question about using the SMART interface for writing as well as reading data.

The question:

looking at the docs they all show how to get data and launch apps but nothing about sending data. Is the import also fhir or do I have to hack the database instead?

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FHIR Prototyping with Node-RED – part 2

In part one of this series, we looked at using node-RED to manage notifications using the FHIR Subscription resource for a Use Case where relatives (or other care givers) could be notified when a person is admitted to hospital. We looked at the overall flow – now let’s look a bit deeper into some of the details.

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SMART, CIMI, FHIR & Argonaut

Saw an interesting question and answer on the SMART support forum about the relationship between SMART and FHIR which Josh has allowed be to copy here (as it’s so topical might now). The question was:

Anyone who happens to know … I’d appreciate it if you could clue me in…

Other than the kick ass implementations done on the SMART-on-FHIR side of world, is there something that SMART adds definitionally to the pile of stuff at documented in a very scattered fashion (not a criticism – it’s the nature of what these things) over at HL7 FHIR? Or is it Boston Children’s/Harvard’s project working to implement the HL7 FHIR standards in a coherent way? Or … what?

Also, via CIMI (which I get the purpose of, I think), I came across Health Services Platform Consortium (HSPC). What are they doing that SMART-on-FHIR isn’t doing? Even all of the posted “apps” that “they” have developed that are running come from you. Do they (above and beyond what the mission is here) have a technical purpose? Or is it politics or marketing or something of the like that I don’t understand.

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Montreal Connectathon

I would imagine that most readers of this blog are aware of the Connectathons that we hold at the beginning of each Working Group Meeting. These events are critical to the evolution of FHIR as an ‘implementer friendly’ standard, so we love to have as many people present as possible!

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SMART on FHIR – adding OAuth2

You may recall that a week back we had a look at one of the connectathon scenarios – the SMART scenario.

In this post we’re going to take the work that we had done in the last post, and make it secure using the SMART version of the OAuth2 standard. As always, a primary reason I’m writing it down is so that when I forget what I did to make it work – I’ll have this as a reference to remind me <s>. And a reminder – I’m using the Java based HAPI FHIR client, in a web based application running in a Tomcat servlet engine, with IntelliJ IDEA as my IDE.
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SMART on FHIR: Part 1

With the 7th connectathon coming up, we’ve looked at the first scenario (Patient access) in a couple of posts and how we can use a couple of the libraries (.net and java) to make this almost trivial to achieve. (btw you don’t have to use these libraries of course – FHIR by itself uses standard technologies so there are a ton of different ways to do this if you already have the technology to do so, or use a different language).

In this post we’re going to take a look at the 3rd connectathon scenario – SMART on FHIR. There’s a lot of information about what this is trying to achieve (the connectathon site has links) so we won’t repeat that here – the ‘elevator pitch’ is that it establishes standards that enable the development of independent applications that can securely access data in any server supporting those standards – this could be an EHR, EMR, Portal or HIE.

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Dev days in November

In the past I’ve talked about the FHIR Developer days hosted by our friends Furore in November in Amsterdam – generally with a slightly envious tone. This year – thanks to my employer Orion Health – I’m able to attend! (I’m going to get into the group picture at last 🙂 )

Since I’m going to be there and I have a clinical background, the Furore folk suggested that I might want to lead a track specifically for Clinicians and Business Analysts who want to learn more about FHIR – so this post is all about putting some ideas out to get feedback.

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Canadian Connectathon

For those who don’t mind snow (though I’m told that by April 29 – the connectathon date – the snow has mostly gone).

Here’s the link to the registration site.

There doesn’t appear to be a website (yet) though there are details in a PDF that you can get from the organizers I’m sure. The tracks are listed as:

  1. Patient resource client
  2. SMART server or client
  3. Questionnaire
  4. Experimental

cheers…

BTW – Lloyd did offer to arrange for snow if I came, but alas…

Project Argonaut and FHIR

Most readers of this blog will be familiar with Project Argonaut – a project announced last year under the aegis of HL7 but funded by a number of US Vendors & Healthcare Providers to help accelerate the development of FHIR, and also the ‘SMART on FHIR‘ project.

Last week there was an on-line kick-off meeting attended by almost 100 people to describe the scope and purpose of the project, and to invite participation in the next phase. The project team were at pains to emphasise that the purpose of Argonaut is to accelerate the current work – it is not a ‘fork’ of the specification, or in competition with it in any way. All of the outputs remain fully open source – in fact they define it as a ‘code and documentation sprint’ – one that is time based and will finish once the objectives have been achieved (though, to my mind, follow-on projects are likely).

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:)