Montreal Connectathon

I would imagine that most readers of this blog are aware of the Connectathons that we hold at the beginning of each Working Group Meeting. These events are critical to the evolution of FHIR as an ‘implementer friendly’ standard, so we love to have as many people present as possible!

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Opening up clinFHIR – An example generator

I’d always intended that clinFHIR would be an open source project.

It all started when we were planning the ‘Clinician Connectathons’ – now ‘Clinicians on FHIR’ a year or so back, and realized that we needed some sort of tooling to support the events – tooling that would allow a user to create resources – and view the references between those resources – in a way that made sense to a clinician rather than a techie, and didn’t require them to understand the ‘on the wire’ formats of a resource (unless they wanted to).

After a few false starts, the current version was developed that seems to meet the need of the events. In fact, there are a number of different tools under the clinFHIR umbrella:

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Test-Driven Development With FHIR

The following post is written by my colleague Peter Jordan – who was the HL7 New Zealand representative at the January Working Group Meeting in Orlando.

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Server roles in FHIR

As part of the preparation for the connectathon and clinicians challenge at the WGM in October, I decided to update clinFHIR so that it can access different servers for data and ‘conformance’ resources like ValueSet and StructureDefinition. Currently clinFHIR assumes that everything it needs to operate is supplied by a single server – from looking up profiles (StructureDefinition resources), finding and expanding ValueSets through to actually storing and retrieving the resources created for a patient. This is fine when the server is Grahames, as he aims to implement the entire specification (and generally succeeds!) but it’s a big ask for any server to do this.

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The clinFHIR Chat

One of the things we’ve found at the various connectathons we’ve held is that communication between the attendees can be an issue – there are quite a number of different ‘streams’ of activity and it can be hard to connect people with questions or comments, to people with answers.

We’ve used skype in the past, which has been OK, but has a number of limitations – it can be quite a firehose, which means that stuff is missed, there’s no easy to maintain a ‘thread’ of conversation (though sometimes interesting when threads get mixed together!) and hard to review the history at the end of the event. Oh – and there’s a fixed limit of 300 people per conversation, which we recently discovered.

So for the ‘Clinicians on FHIR’ event that we’re holding at the HL7 Working Group Meeting in October, we’re going to try a different approach. We’re developing a basic ‘chat’ application that is hierarchically organized, and also integrated with the tooling – clinFHIR – that participants in the event use. If all goes well, it’s also going to help in running ‘virtual’ events in the future, where people are not in the same place.

This post describes how the chat application is structured.

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Canadian Connectathon

For those who don’t mind snow (though I’m told that by April 29 – the connectathon date – the snow has mostly gone).

Here’s the link to the registration site.

There doesn’t appear to be a website (yet) though there are details in a PDF that you can get from the organizers I’m sure. The tracks are listed as:

  1. Patient resource client
  2. SMART server or client
  3. Questionnaire
  4. Experimental

cheers…

BTW – Lloyd did offer to arrange for snow if I came, but alas…

IHE MHD (Mobile Health Data) and FHIR

Just noticed John Moehrke’s post on the recent IHE MHD connectathon. I love the way that this shows how the different organizations involved in healthcare interoperability are working together rather than taking opposing views…