SMART Webinar

And quite by coincidence, this webinar from HL7 that Josh is presenting…

SMART – Scopes and Profiles

In a previous post we looked at some of the ‘security related’ aspects of SMART. In this one we’re going to take a closer look at what the ‘scope’ is, and make a couple of comments on the use of Profiles.

Scope is an AOuth2 term that represents the range of functionality requested by (and potentially granted to) a client application by the Authorization Server. For example an app that displays a person’s vitals might want to be able to read and create Observations.

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Using SMART to talk between systems  

A question I was asked was ‘Can SMART help the scenario where an EMR users wants to access data from another system for the patient they have in context’?

Take the situation where there is, say, an HIE that contains information about a patient that is useful to share in care delivery. It might have the definitive list of the patients medications, all known prescriptions, or their allergies, or encounters – information of value to the clinician and exposed by FHIR interfaces. In New Zealand, it could be the proposed national EHR.

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SMART – Security

So in the last post we went into some details concerning a specific SMART scenario – where a web based application is launched from the EHR (technically an EHR launch as described below). Let’s take a step back and take an overview of SMART as a whole, including some the other ways it can be used.

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Implementing SMART on FHIR in an EHR

We’ve talked about SMART and OAuth2 before, but it was a little while ago and it was in the context of what SMART is about and how it worked (with the odd bit of sample code thrown in). This post takes a slightly different perspective by looking at SMART from the perspective of an EHR (Electronic Health Record) developer tasked with implementing a SMART interface to an EHR– what are they things that they need to consider adding SMART Interfaces ?

We’ll take a slightly roundabout way of doing that by starting with a brief overview and some key points about SMART, then diving into the details of the steps involved in a sample implementation. That’ll be enough for this post, then in a follow up we’ll take a closer look at the issues that our EHR developer will need to resolve. And later on, we’ll switch to the clients perspective.

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Building your own FHIR server

Update: There is a more recent post about this here.

This is an interesting post describing the use of the HAPI library to rapidly build a FHIR server. Another option using the same library is the CLI Library which is even easier – a single file to download and run. (And can be used to populate the server with examples and standard profiles/valuesets)

I’m not sure whether these apps are suitable for production use (though the underlying libraries certainly are) – but they make it absurdly simple to get a FHIR server of your very own up and running so you can learn more about FHIR.

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