Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it’s a beer box!

At the last HL7 Working Group Meeting my good friend Brian Postlethwaite shared with us a video on how he made a plane out of a beer carton! This is so quintessentially Australian (and New Zealand), that I just had to share…

(Can’t wait to see what he does for an encore!)

Updated: here is the encore. This is why New Zealand always beats Australia at Rugby –  we know that the idea is to go BETWEEN the poles…  (The best bit us at 24 seconds)…

FHIR Documents (and other stuff)

I had an email from a company which had a number of really good questions about exposing data through FHIR, so I thought I’d write a post about it rather than just replying directly as it may be of interest to others (and also gives others the opportunity to disagree with me 🙂 )

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Converting v2 to FHIR

At the recent Working Group Meeting in Montreal, I participated in the ‘v2 to FHIR’ stream – focused on how can the HL7 community give advice to implementers about converting v2 messages into FHIR bundles.

Broadly there are 2 approaches to this conversion:

  • The creation of a FHIR message bundle that mirrors the contents of the v2 message, and is intended to be an equivalent representation, behaving in the same way as v2 messages
  • Using the contents of the v2 message to update a FHIR server – perhaps extracting Encounter resources or creating a Bundle that is intended to act as a ‘transaction’ bundle against a FHIR server. I think this will be a much more common use case.

In either case, it’s desirable that HL7 should provide the mappings (insofar as that is possible in v2) from v2 to FHIR.

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How to Profile

Just came across this resource from the firely folk. Michel (author of Forge) pointed me to it when i was asking slicing questions on the FHIR chat.

A great introduction to profiling in FHIR using the Forge tool for concrete examples and well worth a look …

An update to the SMART client

Just a quick note the say that I’ve made a couple of changes to the SMART client we discussed in a previous post.

There’s now an option to start the login process in a separate tab. This is needed because a number of sites I’ve been testing won’t let the login page open in an iFrame (it’s a security thing). When you configure the server, select the ‘separate tab’ option under ‘Where to open Browser’ at the bottom of the first page. Read more of this post

Delving into SMART

While FHIR is not a security standard ‘per se’, there are numerous references in the spec to security related matters – including a specific module in the specification. One of the recommendations made is about SMART – a defined way to use the OAuth2 Authorization framework in FHIR. I recently gave a webinar on SMART, and part of the feedback was that it wasn’t enough detail for a developer to implement a solution – while this wasn’t really the focus of the presentation, it did make me realize that there will be a lot of interest in this from developers, so thought it might be useful to develop a SMART application – and call out the significant parts as we go.

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What’s an API?

I was asked recently by a clinical colleague what an API is, and why it’s important.

Let’s start with the technical answer. ‘API’ stands for ‘Application Programming Interface’ – it’s a way that one application (or a component of an application) exposes its services (which could be just data, or some operation against data) in a way that allows another application (often called the client) to use it. By using an API, it’s possible to develop re-usable libraries – components that can be used by other applications to develop functionality.

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Boston DevDays 2018

In June this year, there will be the first FHIR DevDays in the United States – in Boston.

For those unfamiliar with DevDays (Developer Days), this is a 3 day event simply crammed with FHIR activities – from educational presentations to ‘Connectathon’ type testing to just enjoying the community (and maybe a beer or two…) .

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Creating a resources model

This is the third post in a mini series on using the Logical modeler. In the first post we talked in generalities of models (admitting that this is very much a work in progress), and then we discussed the Information Model – a model that is used to capture clinical requirements for information exchange. Now, it’s time to think about how we can design real FHIR artifacts from the work so far.

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Creating models with the Logical Modeler

It’s been a while since we talked about the clinFHIR Logical Modeler, and I’ve had a few questions about it, so I thought an update might be in order.

The term ‘Logical Model’ can be used in different ways (much like ‘Profile’) so let’s first define just what we are talking about. Basically, it’s just a hierarchical model of data – much like you see in any of the core FHIR resource types – with the exception that the model does not have to align with any of the core types. Other than the requirement that you must use the FHIR datatypes, there are no limits on the complexity of the model you create (though overly complex models can be hard to understand – or use).

In this post we’ll talk about the general aspects of using the modeler – subsequent posts will go into more detail about how to build them.

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