Creating a resources model

This is the third post in a mini series on using the Logical modeler. In the first post we talked in generalities of models (admitting that this is very much a work in progress), and then we discussed the Information Model – a model that is used to capture clinical requirements for information exchange. Now, it’s time to think about how we can design real FHIR artifacts from the work so far.

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Building an Information model.

As described in the previous post, an Information model is used to capture the data requirements for a use case in a structured way, using the FHIR datatypes, but not aligned with the core FHIR resource types. This means that you can’t create an instance of this model – it’s just for analysis – but it will inform the development of the real FHIR artifacts.

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Creating models with the Logical Modeler

It’s been a while since we talked about the clinFHIR Logical Modeler, and I’ve had a few questions about it, so I thought an update might be in order.

The term ‘Logical Model’ can be used in different ways (much like ‘Profile’) so let’s first define just what we are talking about. Basically, it’s just a hierarchical model of data – much like you see in any of the core FHIR resource types – with the exception that the model does not have to align with any of the core types. Other than the requirement that you must use the FHIR datatypes, there are no limits on the complexity of the model you create (though overly complex models can be hard to understand – or use).

In this post we’ll talk about the general aspects of using the modeler – subsequent posts will go into more detail about how to build them.

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